How to read poetry aloud

So you want to learn how to read poetry aloud. Good!

A young man talking aloud, filling the air with swirls of;

It's likely then you're preparing for a special occasion where you are going to stand in front of others to deliver your chosen verse.

For many people this is terrifying.

They're scared they'll stumble over the words, won't understand what the poem is about and consequently make a complete fool of themselves.

If that is you, relax.
A poem is not a poisonous
snake. It will not bite and you do not have to tip-toe around it.

Learning how to read poetry aloud is relatively straightforward and with practice you may even get to enjoy it!

Step one

Read your chosen poem through silently several times to familiarize yourself with its core ideas and images.

The more you understand the poem, the more likely your audience will be to understand it.

Allow yourself to see the images
created by the words in your imagination. Likewise feel the emotions.

The more strongly you identify with or own the poem the easier it will be for your audience to follow.

Look up any unfamiliar words in an online dictionary for their meaning and pronunciation.

Step Two

Read the poem quietly aloud to yourself following the guidelines given by the punctuation, listening for its musicality or beat.

If you need them, there are tips for interpreting punctuation here.

American poet, Eve Merriam has inspired countless people all over
the world to play with poetry by making it accessible and fun.

Try this poem aloud.
It's truly delicious!

How to Eat a Poem

Don't be polite.
Bite in.
Pick it up with your fingers and lick the
juice that may run down your chin.
It is ready and ripe now, wherever you are.

You do not need a knife or a fork or a spoon
or plate or napkin or tablecloth.

For there is no core
or stem
or rind
or pit
or seed
or skin
to throw away.

Find more about Eve Merriam here.

Read slowly. Allow each word its space. The temptation is to rush. Resist
it.

Once you've 'got the flow', stand up and read the poem aloud authoritatively.

Step three

Now that you're more confident 'play' with your delivery, experimenting with vocal variety.

For example, what happens if you stress this word rather than that word?

You can find more about playing with vocal variety here.

Rehearse in front of several friends before going 'live'.
Have them give you feed back on:

  1. clarity
    Could they hear and understand your words?
  2. meaning
    Did they understand the images and feelings of the poem?
  3. speaking rate
    Were you speaking too fast or too slowly?
  4. voice
    Too loud, too soft, too high, too low...

Incorporate their feedback and present your poem.

Extra tips on reading poetry aloud

  • You do not need a 'dramatic' voice to be successful. An assumed voice will seem artificial and strained.
  • Remember to breathe. Holding your breath heightens tension, which in turn heightens the tone of your voice.
  • Use the natural pauses in the poem to take a breath, for example on a full stop or period.
  • If the occasion is emotional for example, the poem is part of eulogy, wedding or retirement speech, print it out in a large font so it is easily read. Marking the pauses, breath or stress points using a highlighter, will also help you remember what you
    rehearsed.
  • Stand tall and relaxed, just as you would for delivering a speech.
  • And just in case you need them, here's tips for managing
    public speaking anxiety and some good breathing exercises.

Reading poetry aloud is a gift

The ability to read poetry aloud is a gift of immense value to your audience because the right poem, read well, expresses with grace and clarity thoughts and feelings that are often difficult to find appropriate words for in ordinary prose.


Would you like to listen to some poems?
(It's me, Susan, reading them.)

  • I am Standing Upon the Seashore
  • Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep
  • Funeral Blues
  • Prayer of St. Francis of Assisi

Or perhaps you'd like to write your own poem?

It's not as difficult as you may think and you'll have something original and very special to offer.

Find out here how to write a poem in free verse.


Related pages you may enjoy:

  1. a large selection of timeless, cross-cultural poems for funerals
  2. my favorite wedding poems and readings - another across time and cultures collection
  3. an insanely long page of inspirational quotations, eulogy quotes and funeral readings. My excuse for the length of page? There were too many of beauty and value! How could I leave any out?






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